From Bench to Bedside and Back Again: Developments in the Evidence-Informed Practice (and Practice-Informed Research) of Acupuncture

From Bench to Bedside and Back Again: Developments in the Evidence-Informed Practice (and Practice-Informed Research) of Acupuncture

This column continues the series from the Society for Acupuncture Research (SAR), for which JICM serves as the society journal. The column drives to the heart of a troubling issue for the field: the significant gap between substantive research findings and the uptake of acupuncture among most institutions in the mainstream dominant medical industry. Of particular interest to this reader is the focus of the first four of the noted initiatives: to help educate acupuncture practitioners, as agents of change, to be better equipped to advocate for the growing body of acupuncture science. A salute to this pro-activity! ~ John Weeks, Contributing Editor, Special Projects and Collaborations, JICM

The changing clinical landscape in acupuncture for women’s health: a cross-sectional online survey in New Zealand and Australia

The changing clinical landscape in acupuncture for women’s health: a cross-sectional online survey in New Zealand and Australia

Acupuncture practitioners in Australia and New Zealand commonly treat women’s health conditions, but this is usually the result of women seeking them out, rather than being referred from a medical practitioner. The majority of practitioners did report changing their women’s health practice, but peer reviewed academic articles alone are not an ideal medium to convey this information since practitioners favour knowledge obtained from webinars and conferences. Academics and other clinician researchers should consider alternative means of disseminating knowledge beyond traditional academic publications and conferences, special interest groups may assist in this and also help improve research literacy.

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